Fun and Magic - Magic Mike the Magician - Phone (206) 632-7152 - 700 pages of goodies.

Photo links 56
Web's Best Photo and Art Links

From Magic Mike
My collection of links to photos of the best Hubble Space Telescope photos and other NASA photos, incredible landscapes, scenic wonders and wildlife animals, AND Art Masters of the 10th through 20th Centuries from World Museums.

The Space Shuttle Docking Ring at the International Spacwe Station Credit: STS-92 Crew, NASA - Explanation: A space shuttle is again visiting the International Space Station (ISS). The STS-92 crew aboard Discovery have already delivered and installed a truss and a docking port on the growing orbiting space station. The station is being prepared for its first permanent crew, currently scheduled to be launched from Kazakstan on October 30. Pictured above, the shuttle's docking ring is being extended to enable a stable connection to the space station. Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (USRA) NASA Technical Rep.: Jay Norris. Specific rights apply. A service of: LHEA at NASA/ GSFC & Michigan Tech. U.
Dust and Gas Surrounding Star R Coronae Australis Credit: F. Comeron, WFI, MPG, La Silla Observatory, ESO - Explanation: Young star R Coronae Australis has a dusty home. The dust is so thick on the upper left of the above photograph that little light from background stars comes through. Thinner dust near the stars reflects light from R Coronae Australis (upper right) and neighbor TY Coronae Australis, giving their surroundings a flowing appearance. Were these stars more massive they would emit light energetic enough to ionize much of the nearly invisible surrounding hydrogen gas, causing it to appear bright red. The unusual structure above the center is a Herbig-Haro object, a knot of gas ejected from the star that has impacted surrounding gas. R Coronae Australis is about 500 light-years away, while the region shown is about four light years across. Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (USRA) NASA Technical Rep.: Jay Norris. Specific rights apply. A service of: LHEA at NASA/GSFC & Michigan Tech. U.
Earth's Richat Structure Credit: STS-41G Crew, Space Shuttle Challenger, NASA - Explanation: What on Earth is that? The Richat Structure in the Sahara Desert of Mauritania is easily visible from space because it is nearly 50 kilometers across. Once thought to be an impact crater, the Richat Structure's flat middle and lack of shock-altered rock indicates otherwise. The possibility that the Richat Structure was formed by a volcanic eruption also seems improbable because of the lack of a dome of igneous or volcanic rock. Rather, the layered sedimentary rock of the Richat structure is now thought by many to have been caused by uplifted rock sculpted by erosion. Why the Richat Structure is nearly circular remains a mystery. Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (USRA) NASA Technical Rep.: Jay Norris. Specific rights apply. A service of: LHEA at NASA/GSFC & Michigan Tech. U.
N81: Star Cradle in the SMC Credit: M. Heydari-Malayeri (Paris Obs.) et al., Hubble Heritage Team, NASA - Explanation: This dramatic Hubble Space Telescope image captures the birth of a cluster of massive stars. The newborn stars are seen just as they emerge from their natal nebula. Only 12 light-years across, the nebula is cataloged as N81 and lies some 200,000 light-years away within a neighboring galaxy known as the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). Other nebulae which surround massive star clusters can be a thousand or more light-years across. But, prior to the Hubble observations, it was unknown whether N81 and similar, compact emission nebulae were cradles of single stars or star clusters. In the case of N81, the Hubble data clearly reveal multiple hot stars, some nearly 300,000 times as luminous as the Sun. The colorful image emphasizes graceful arcs of dark interstellar dust and fluorescing gas sculpted by the young stars' energetic winds and radiation. Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (USRA) NASA Technical Rep.: Jay Norris. Specific rights apply. A service of: LHEA at NASA/GSFC & Michigan Tech. U.
Dusk on Mount Shasta Lower Klamath - NWR, CA/OR You almost feel like you're in the "Big Sky" country of Montana when you spend time in the shadows of Mount Shasta in northern California. For me, the sunsets here are simply gorgeous. This simple image was taken right alongside state highway 161. For ten years I have made a winter trip to this area that sits on the Oregon and California border. And for as many trips, I continue to find beauty in an area that most folks would simply drive through without stopping to gaze. Winters can be brutal in this part of the state, but for this photographer, beauty abounds and numbs me to the cold. A California Portfolio - by Lon Overacker, PhotoTripUSA.
September Sky (labeled photo) Credit & Copyright: Stan Richard - Explanation: Star clusters, planets, and a red giant posed for this portrait of the night sky from rural Jasper County, Iowa, USA. Astrophotographer Stan Richard recorded the four minute time exposure looking east around midnight on September 3rd at Ashton-Wildwood Park. To avoid star trails, his camera was mounted on a barndoor-style tracker to compensate for the Earth's rotation. Can you identify his celestial subjects? (Click on the image for a labeled version.) The Pleiades and Hyades, the closest open or galactic star clusters to the Sun, should be recognizable to beginning stargazers. Of course gas giant Jupiter rules as the brightest object in the picture and the largest planet in the Solar System, but second largest planet Saturn is also visible nearby. For sheer size cool red giant star Aldebaran is more impressive though, spanning about forty times the diameter of the Sun. Sixty light-years away and yellowish in this picture, Aldebaran is known as Alpha Tauri, the brightest star in Taurus, the Bull. Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (USRA) NASA Technical Rep.: Jay Norris. Specific rights apply. A service of: LHEA at NASA/GSFC & Michigan Tech. U.
Heating Coronal Loops (Four MOVIES) Credit: M. Aschwanden et al. (LMSAL), TRACE, NASA Explanation: Extending above the photosphere or visible surface of the Sun, the faint, tenuous solar corona can't be easily seen from Earth, but it is measured to be hundreds of times hotter than the photosphere itself. What makes the solar corona so hot? Astronomers have long sought the source of the corona's heat in magnetic fields which loft monstrous loops of solar plasma above the photosphere. Still, new and dramatically detailed observations of coronal loops from the orbiting TRACE satellite are now pointing more closely to the unidentified energy source. Recorded in extreme ultraviolet light, this and other TRACE images indicate that most of the heating occurs low in the corona, near the bases of the loops as they emerge from and return to the solar surface. The new results confound the established theory which relies on heating the loops uniformly. This tantalizing TRACE image shows clusters of the majestic, hot coronal loops which span 30 or more times the diameter of planet Earth. Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (USRA) NASA Technical Rep.: Jay Norris. Specific rights apply. A service of: LHEA at NASA/GSFC & Michigan Tech. U.
Leaf and Spider - Close-ups of Summer in Norway, NATURE PHOTOS by Odd Ketil Saebo, Oslo.
tip jar Hey, how about throwing a $5 tip in my tip jar to help my site? I'll teach you the secret of my tie trick!
If you enjoyed my ever growing site of fun and good stuff toss $5 once a year.The tie trick is great for breaking the ice with people, and you'll get free drinks and tips for life.


Back to home page of Fun And Magic Dot Com http://funandmagic.com.

To email Magic Mike Click Here.
To subscribe to Magic Mike's Clean Jokes and Good Stuff Mailer, Click Here.
Read what others said about the site and write something yourself in my guestbook.html.


If you have a web site, for a sweet deal that will make you money, click on this

Webmaster Magic Mike Berger.


by Magic Mike the Magician, Seattle, Wa. 98133, except as noted. All Rights Reserved.
747 N. 135th St #227 Seattle 98133, Wa. 98133 Seattle, WA 98133 Phone (206) 632-7152 Cell (206) 632-7152