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Photo links 49
Web's Best Photo and Art Links
From Magic Mike
My collection of links to photos of the best Hubble Space Telescope photos and other NASA photos,incredible landscapes, scenic wonders and wildlife animals,
AND Art Masters of the 10th through 20th Centuries from World Museums.

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Waterfall - This unnamed and seldom-seen waterfall is near Pete Creek on the Continental Divide in the Centennial Mountains. The Centennail Mountain Range runs east/west forty miles, forming the border between Idaho and Montana from Red Rock Pass to Monida Pass. The Continental Divide Trail - the Photography of Leland Howard - PhotoTripUSA.
Limber Pine Stump - A weathered alpine spruce stump bears witness to the extreme weather conditions on the crest of the Divide near Bannock Pass. Higher peaks of the Beaverhead Mountains of the Bitterroot Range can be seen in the background. The Continental Divide Trail - the Photography of Leland Howard - PhotoTripUSA.
Sunrise - Sunrise and low-lying clouds in the Boulder Mountains paint a picture worthy of a master water-colorist. This photo was taken about two miles east of Champion Pass in the Deerlodge National Forest, north of Butte, Montana. The Continental Divide Trail - the Photography of Leland Howard - PhotoTripUSA.
Moon & Fog - East of the Anaconda-Pintler Wilderness, the Continental Divide Trail crosses the Mount Haggin Wildlife Management Area. At these lower elevations, stands of aspen and conifers are punctuated with islands of sagebrush and grassy meadows. The Continental Divide Trail - the Photography of Leland Howard - PhotoTripUSA.
The Carina Nebula in Infrared Credit: 2MASS Collaboration, U. Mass., IPAC - Explanation: About three million years ago, the stars in the Keyhole Nebula began to form. The above picture of the Keyhole Nebula, also known as the Carina Nebula or NGC 3372, shows in infrared light many facets of this dramatic stellar nursery which lies only 9,000 light-years away. Fine dust reflects starlight while being heated and emitting light of its own. Open clusters Trumpler 14 and Trumpler 16 are visible in the lower left and upper right of the nebula. The bright star near Trumpler 14 is called Eta Carinae and is one of the most unusual stars known. A candidate for a supernova in the next few thousand years, Eta Carinae faded from being one of the brightest stars in the sky during the 1800s. Despite intensive study, astronomers remain unsure whether Eta Carinae is part of a binary star system. Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (USRA) NASA Technical Rep.: Jay Norris. Specific rights apply. A service of: LHEA at NASA/GSFC & Michigan Tech. U.
Devils Club Berry Cascade Mountains, WA - Devils club is definitely a well named plant. It is heavily armed with needle-like spines on its entire stem system as well as on the underside of its one foot wide leaves. The plant creates impenetrable thickets. I really liked this composition because the plant's berry was impaled on its own spines. Intimate Landscapes - by Slavomir Dzieciatkowski, photoTripUSA.
M101: An Ultraviolet View Credit: Astro 2, UIT, NASA Explanation: This giant spiral galaxy, Messier 101 (M101), was photographed by the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT). UIT flew into orbit as part of the Astro 2 mission on-board the Space Shuttle Endeavour in March 1995. The image has been processed so that the colors (purple to white) represent an increasing intensity of ultraviolet light. Pictures of galaxies like this one show mainly clouds of gas containing newly formed stars many times more massive than the sun, which glow strongly in ultraviolet light. In contrast, visible light pictures of galaxies tend to be dominated by the yellow and red light of older stars. Ultraviolet light, invisible to the human eye, is blocked by ozone in the atmosphere so ultraviolet pictures of celestial objects must be taken from space. M101 is a mere 22 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major. Its popular moniker is the Pinwheel Galaxy. Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (USRA) NASA Technical Rep.: Jay Norris. Specific rights apply. A service of: LHEA at NASA/GSFC & Michigan Tech. U.
Vela Pulsar: Neutron Star-Ring-Jet Credit: G.Garmire et al. (PSU), NASA - Explanation: This stunning image from the orbiting Chandra X-ray Observatory is centered on the Vela pulsar -- the collapsed stellar core within the Vela supernova remnant some 800 light-years distant. The Vela pulsar is a neutron star. More massive than the Sun, it has the density of an atomic nucleus. About 12 miles in diameter it spins 10 times a second as it hurtles through the supernova debris cloud. The pulsar's electric and magnetic fields accelerate particles to nearly the speed of light, powering the compact x-ray emission nebula revealed in the Chandra picture. The cosmic crossbow shape is over 0.2 light-years across, composed of an arrow-like jet emanating from the polar region of the neutron star and bow-like inner and outer arcs believed to be the edges of tilted rings of x-ray emitting high energy particles. Impressively, the swept back compact nebula indicates the neutron star is moving up and to the right in this picture, exactly along the direction of the x-ray jet. The Vela pulsar (and associated supernova remnant) was created by a massive star which exploded over 10,000 years ago. Its awesome x-ray rings and jet are reminiscent of another well-known pulsar powered system, the Crab Nebula. Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (USRA) NASA Technical Rep.: Jay Norris. Specific rights apply. A service of: LHEA at NASA/GSFC & Michigan Tech. U.
Active Regions, CMEs, and X-Class Flares
Image Credit: ISAS, Yohkoh Project, SXT Group - Explanation: Space Weather forcasters are predicting major storm conditions over the next few days as the active Sun has produced at least three strong flares and a large coronal mass ejection (CME) since Tuesday, June 6th. This recent false color X-ray image of the Sun shows the active region generating the explosive events, here the Sun's most intense source of X-rays, as the dominant bright area just above center. X-ray hot plasma suspended in looping magnetic fields arcs above this region, cataloged as AR9026. AR9026 appears as a large group of sunspots in visible light images. The three intense flares were all X-class events, the most severe class of solar flares based on X-ray flux measurements by the earth-orbiting GOES satellites. Energetic particles from the CME, associated with the second X-class flare, were directed toward planet Earth and could produce geomagnetic storms as early as today. Possible effects range from increased auroral displays to disruptions of satellite and communications systems and electrical power grids. But wait ... there's more! In the coming days AR9026, carried slowly across the Sun (from left to right) by solar rotation, is likely to produce even more solar flares. Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (USRA) NASA Technical Rep.: Jay Norris. Specific rights apply. A service of: LHEA at NASA/GSFC & Michigan Tech. U.
A Continuous Eruption on Jupiter's Moon Io Credit: Galileo Project, JPL, NASA Explanation: A volcano on Jupiter's moon Io has been photographed recently during an ongoing eruption. Hot glowing lava is visible on the left on this representative-color image. A glowing landscape of plateaus and valleys covered in sulfur and silicate rock surrounds the active volcano. Many features including several of the dark spots have evolved between February 2000, when the robot spacecraft Galileo currently orbiting Jupiter took this picture, and November 1999. Io is slightly larger than Earth's Moon and is the closest large moon to Jupiter. The above image shows a region about 250 kilometers across. How the internal structure of Io creates these active volcanoes remains under investigation. Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (USRA) NASA Technical Rep.: Jay Norris. Specific rights apply. A service of: LHEA at NASA/GSFC & Michigan Tech. U.
In the Heart of the Crab Credit: William P. Blair (JHU) et al. Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA), NASA - Explanation: The supernova explosion that formed the Crab Nebula was first seen on the year 1054. Last week, astronomers released a new image of the still-evolving center of the explosion. The above representative-color photograph was taken in colors emitted by specific elements including hydrogen (orange), nitrogen (red), sulfur (pink), and oxygen (green), with the result appearing oddly similar to a Jackson Pollack painting. Visible is a complex array of gas filaments rushing out at over 5 million kilometers per hour. Even at these tremendous speeds, it takes a filament over 600 years to cross the 3 light year wide frame. The rapidly spinning neutron star remnant of this ancient cataclysm is visible as the lower of the two bright stars just above the photograph center. The Crab Nebula (M1) is located 6,500 light-years away towards the constellation of Taurus. - Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (USRA) NASA Technical Rep.: Jay Norris. Specific rights apply. A service of: LHEA at NASA/GSFC & Michigan Tech. U.