Children Magic | Adult Magic | Business Magic |Tavern - Restaurant Customer Builder Promotion | Learn Tie Trick. |
Performer's Rights | Send Mike A Donation 

 

 

Fun and Magic - Magic Mike the Magician - Phone (206) 632-7152

Children Magic | Adult Magic | Business Magic |Tavern - Restaurant Customer Builder Promotion | Learn Tie Trick. |
Performer's Rights | Send Mike A Donation 



Photo links 71
Web's Best Photo and Art Links

From Magic Mike
My collection of recommended links to photos of the best Hubble Space Telescope photos and other NASA photos, incredible landscape photos, scenic wonders, wildlife animal photos, AND the Renaissance Art Masters, art work of the 10th through 20th Centuries from World Museums.
These photos are links, to sites owned by other people, for private viewing, not for commercial use.

Refresh and reload on your browser to see the newest links and not a cached page.

NGC 4414: A Flocculent Spiral Galaxy Credit: Olivier Vallejo (Observatoire de Bordeaux), HST, ESA, NASA Explanation: How much mass do flocculent spirals hide? The above true color image of flocculent spiral galaxy NGC 4414 was taken with the Hubble Space Telescope to help answer this question. Flocculent spirals -- galaxies without well defined spiral arms -- are a quite common form of galaxy, and NGC 4414 is one of the closest. Stars and gas near the visible edge of spiral galaxies orbit the center so fast that the gravity from a large amount of unseen dark matter must be present to hold them together. Pictured above is the photogenic center of NGC 4414. A bright foreground star from our Milky Way Galaxy shines in the foreground of the image. Although NGC 4414's center likely holds little dark matter, understanding its matter distribution helps calibrate the rest of the galaxy and, by deduction, flocculent spirals in general. By determining a precise distance to NGC 4414, astronomers also hope to help calibrate the scale to the more distant universe. Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (USRA) NASA Technical Rep.: Jay Norris. Specific rights apply. A service of: LHEA at NASA/ GSFC & Michigan Tech. U.
Looking Into an Io Volcano Credit: Galileo Project, JPL, NASA Explanation: What would it look like to peer into one of the volcanoes currently active on Jupiter's moon Io? The caldera of Tupan Patera, named after a Brazilian thunder god, reveals itself to be a strange and dangerous place, replete with hot black lava, warm red sulfur deposits likely deposited from vented gas, and hilly yellow terrain also high in sulfur. The robot spacecraft Galileo currently orbiting Jupiter provided the above vista late last year when it swooped by the active world. Tupan Patera is actually a volcanic depression, surrounded by cliffs nearly a kilometer high. The width of the depression is about 75 kilometers. As Galileo has filled its mission objectives and is running low on maneuvering fuel, NASA plans to crash the spacecraft into Jupiter during 2003. Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (USRA) NASA Technical Rep.: Jay Norris. Specific rights apply. A service of: LHEA at NASA/ GSFC & Michigan Tech. U.
Methane Earth Credit: GISS, NASA Explanation: Can you help in reducing this blanket of methane gas that is warming up our Earth? Recent evidence holds that methane (CH4) is second only to carbon dioxide (CO2) in creating a warming greenhouse effect but is easier to control. Atmospheric methane has doubled over the past 200 years, and its smothering potency is over 20 times that of CO2. Methane may even be responsible for a sudden warming of the Earth by seven degrees Celsius about 55 million years ago. As most methane is produced biologically, the gas is sometimes associated with bathroom humor. The largest abundance released by the US, however, is created when anaerobic bacteria break down carbon-based garbage in landfills. Therefore, a more effective way to help our planet than trying to restrict your own methane emissions would be to encourage efficient landfill gas management. Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (USRA) NASA Technical Rep.: Jay Norris. Specific rights apply. A service of: LHEA at NASA/ GSFC & Michigan Tech. U.
Columbia Dawn Credit A. Barrett, KSC, NASA Explanation: Trailing a thick column of exhaust, the Space Shuttle Columbia blasted into the twilight morning sky on March 1, its thundering rockets briefly flooding a cloud bank with the light of a false dawn. The event marked the start of the ongoing eleven day mission to upgrade the Hubble Space Telescope. Hubble's upgrades include the installation of new solar arrays and a new camera. Columbia's crew is scheduled to complete the work today in the last of five space walks. Columbia's launch also marks the first flight of the oldest operating space shuttle after receiving extensive upgrades itself, designed to increase its capabilities for missions to low Earth orbit. The shuttle landing is expected at Kennedy Space Center on March 12. Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (USRA) NASA Technical Rep.: Jay Norris. Specific rights apply. A service of: LHEA at NASA/ GSFC & Michigan Tech. U.
Volcano and Aurora in Iceland Credit & Copyright: Sigurdur H. Stefnisson Explanation: Sometimes both heaven and Earth erupt. In Iceland in 1991, the volcano Hekla erupted at the same time that auroras were visible overhead. Hekla, one of the most famous volcanoes in the world, has erupted at least 20 times over the past millennium, sometimes causing great destruction. The last eruption occurred only two years ago but caused only minor damage. The green auroral band occurred fortuitously about 100 kilometers above the erupting lava. Is Earth the Solar System's only planet with both auroras and volcanos? Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (USRA) NASA Technical Rep.: Jay Norris. Specific rights apply. A service of: LHEA at NASA/ GSFC & Michigan Tech. U.
Moonrise Over Seattle Credit & Copyright: Shay Stephens Explanation: Is the Moon larger when near the horizon? No -- as shown above, the Moon appears to be very nearly the same size no matter its location on the sky. Oddly, the cause or causes for the common Moon Illusion are still being debated. Two leading explanations both hinge on the illusion that foreground objects make a horizon Moon seem farther in the distance. The historically most popular explanation then holds that the mind interprets more distant objects as wider, while a more recent explanation adds that the distance illusion may actually make the eye focus differently. Either way, the angular diameter of the Moon is always about 0.5 degrees. In the above time-lapse sequence taken near the end of last year, the Moon was briefly re-imaged every 2.5 minutes, with the last exposure of longer duration to bring up a magnificent panorama of the city of Seattle. Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (USRA) NASA Technical Rep.: Jay Norris. Specific rights apply. A service of: LHEA at NASA/ GSFC & Michigan Tech. U.
Sun Halo at Winter Solstice Credit & Copyright: Philip Appleton (SIRTF Science Center), Caltech Explanation: Sometimes it looks like the Sun is being viewed through a large lens. In the above case, however, there are actually millions of lenses: ice crystals. As water freezes in the upper atmosphere, small, flat, six-sided, ice crystals might be formed. As these crystals flutter to the ground, much time is spent with their faces flat, parallel to the ground. An observer may pass through the same plane as many of the falling ice crystals near sunrise or sunset. During this alignment, each crystal can act like a miniature lens, refracting sunlight into our view and creating phenomena like parhelia, the technical term for sundogs. The above image was taken in the morning of the 2000 Winter Solstice near Ames, Iowa, USA. Visible in the image center is the Sun, while two bright sundogs glow prominently from both the left and the right. Also visible behind neighborhood houses and trees are the 22 degree halo, three sun pillars, and the upper tangent arc, all created by sunlight reflecting off of atmospheric ice crystals. Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (USRA) NASA Technical Rep.: Jay Norris. Specific rights apply. A service of: LHEA at NASA/ GSFC & Michigan Tech. U.
Blue Flash Credit & Copyright: Mario Cogo Explanation: Difficult to observe, the momentary green flash above the rising or setting sun has been documented as a phenomenon caused by the atmospheric bending or refraction of sunlight. Like a weak prism, the Earth's atmosphere breaks white sunlight into colors, bending red colors slightly and green and blue colors through increasingly larger angles. When the sky is clear, a green flash just above the sun's edge can sometimes be seen for a second or so, when the sun is close to a distant horizon. A blue flash is even harder to see though, because the atmosphere must be extraordinarily clear to avoid scattering and diminishing the refracted blue sunlight. Still, from a site near Roques de los Muchachos (altitude 2,400 meters) on La Palma in the Canary Islands, astrophotographer Mario Cogo captured this dramatic telescopic image of a blue flash on color film in October of 2001. The image of the setting Sun with large sunspot groups on its surface is heavily distorted by atmospheric layers. A lingering green rim is just visible under the tantalizing blue flash. Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (USRA) NASA Technical Rep.: Jay Norris. Specific rights apply. A service of: LHEA at NASA/ GSFC & Michigan Tech. U.
The Doll House - A whimsical playground. Hoodoos & Other Fantastic Stone Creatures - by Laurent Martres.
Starlight Reflections Credit & Copyright: Robert Gendler Explanation: Interstellar dust grains often find themselves in a reflective "mood". Near a bright star, clouds of these dust particles scatter short wavelengths of visible starlight more readily than long wavelengths, producing lovely blue reflection nebulae. Nine of the more spectacular examples of these dusty, blue stellar neighborhoods have been assembled here by astrophotographer Rob Gendler. From left to right starting with the top row are NGC 1977 in Orion, IC2118 (the Witch Head), and M78 also in Orion. Across the middle row are, M20 (Trifid), NGC 2264 in Monoceros, and IC405 (Flaming Star Nebula). Along the bottom are NGC 2023 (near the Horsehead), NGC 7023 (Iris Nebula), and finally bright star Merope surrounded by a veil of dust (NGC 1435). Merope is one of the seven sisters of the Pleiades. Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (USRA) NASA Technical Rep.: Jay Norris. Specific rights apply. A service of: LHEA at NASA/ GSFC & Michigan Tech. U.
Himalayan Horizon From Space Credit: Expedition 1, ISS, EOL NASA Explanation: This stunning aerial view shows the rugged snow covered peaks of a Himalayan mountain range in Nepal. The seventh-highest peak on the planet, Dhaulagiri, is the high point on the horizon at the left while in the foreground lies the southern Tibetan Plateau of China. But, contrary to appearances, this picture wasn't taken from an airliner cruising at 30,000 feet. Instead it was taken with a 35mm camera and telephoto lens by the Expedition 1 crew aboard the International Space Station -- orbiting 200 nautical miles above the Earth. The Himalayan mountains were created by crustal plate tectonics on planet Earth some 70 million years ago, as the Indian plate began a collision with the Eurasian plate. Himalayan uplift still continues today at a rate of a few millimeters per year. Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (USRA) NASA Technical Rep.: Jay Norris. Specific rights apply. A service of: LHEA at NASA/ GSFC & Michigan Tech. U.


Back to home page of Fun And Magic Dot Com http://funandmagic.com.
To enter Seattle Magic Mike the magician's site map click here.
Magic Stuff.
Children Magician
Adult Magician
Business Magician
Tradeshow Magic
Learn Tie Trick
See Magic Tricks
Sales Training
How to Accomplish Impossible In Sales
Newspaper trick.
Magicians Lessons.
Balloon Lessons.
Market Yourself
Magic Show Photos
Guestbook.html.
E-mail Magic Mike
Leave A Tip
Send A Show Deposit

Home Page
Mind Stuff.
Inspirational Art,
and Great Quotes
.
ESP Finding Stuff.
ESP Lightning Strike
Butterfly On Finger
ESP Find Dalai Lama
ESP Volcano missed
ESP Predict Quakes
Reincarnated Boy
Tharlam Monastery
Read Literature.
Read The Bible
Read Wisdom Sutra
Read Tao Te Ching
Ancient game of Go.
Fun Stuff.
Wallpaper photos:
Space,
Fine Art, Landscape, Animals
Award Short Movies
Award Animations
.
Magic Joke Parlor.
Cartoon Of Day
Funny Photos
.
Bumper Stickers.
Movie Previews.
Movie Reviews.
Aquarium Cam.
Time-Lapse Photos.
Harry Potter Gifts.
Cool stuff to hear.
Horoscope/Astrology
WDFM Penn State radio comedy 1969
Birth of FM Radio
Info Stuff.
Thousands Of Great Recipes
Food & Drink - new daily
Useful Links
Travel, Embassies.
Medical News - new daily
Cancer News
- new daily
Natural Science - new daily
Science News. - new daily
Space News - new daily
Newspapers.
TV News networks
World News Wires

Global Dimming!!
First Amendment Rights
for Street Performers

Info
Website Magic


tie animation at bar
Learn My Tie Trick


Nobody should drink the chemicals in the water!




Get the solution at







Learn magic.
Amazing Magic Mike teaches his incredible "One Handed, One Second Windsor Trick."

Penn State Nittany Lion
The Adventures
of Super Stater
WDFM Penn State radio comedy cliffhanger from 1969.

Magic Mike the Magician
Seattle, Lynnwood, Everett, Bellevue, Redmond, Issaquah, Kent




No portion of this site may be used, displayed, or linked to without written authorization.
All Rights Reserved Copyright 1996 - 2013
by Magic Mike Berger, Seattle except as noted.