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Photo links 36
Web's Best Photo and Art Links
From Magic Mike

My collection of links to photos of the best Hubble Space Telescope photos and other NASA photos,
incredible landscapes, scenic wonders and wildlife animals,
AND Art Masters of the 10th through 20th Centuries from World Museums.


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Mount Rainier Sunrise - One of my favorite subjects. The many moods of Mount Rainier. Here she sits, waiting for the day to begin. - Dale L. Brown Jr. Photo Gallery
Flamingo Dancing - Robert Byrnes Photo Gallery
Sunset at Longmire- Winter evenings at Longmire, on the southwest flank of Mount Rainier, give that magic hour lighting on The Mountain. Winter storms bring winds to mobilize the snow and give a Kirlian light effect to the upper mountain. - by Ron Warfield PhotoTripUSA
Colored sunset over Norway - This is a wonderful photo from Norway photographer Ola Albert, Bjerrang Gallery - Norway
Ocean Sunset - A wonderful picture of sunset over the ocean. A bird flying by is nicely framed. - Robert Byrnes' Photo Gallery
New Stars In 30 Doradus Credit: John Trauger (JPL), James Westphal (Caltech), Nolan Walborn (STScI), Rodolfo Barba' (La Plata Observatory), NASA - Explanation: Compare these matched Hubble Space Telescope views (visible-light on top; infrared on bottom) of a region in the star-forming 30 Doradus Nebula. Find the numbered arrows in the infrared image which identify newborn massive stars. For example, arrows 1 and 5 both point to compact clusters of bright young stars. Formed within collapsing gas and dust clouds, the winds and radiation from these hot stars have cleared away the remaining obscuring material making the clusters easily apparent in both visible and infrared images. But still shrouded in dust and readily seen only in the penetrating infrared view are newborn stars and star systems indicated by arrows 2, 3, and 4. Perhaps even more remarkable are the infrared bright spots indicated by arrows 6 and 7. Exactly in a line on opposite sides of the bright cluster at arrow 5, they may actually be caused by symmetric jets of material produced by one of the young cluster stars. These luminous spots are each about 5 light-years from the cluster and would correspond to points at which the energetic jet material impacts the surrounding dust clouds. Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (USRA) NASA Technical Rep.: Jay Norris. Specific rights apply. A service of: LHEA at NASA/ GSFC & Michigan Tech. U.
Massive Stars Of 30 Doradus - (Large Version!) Credit: John Trauger (JPL), James Westphal (Caltech), Nolan Walborn (STScI), Rodolfo Barba' (La Plata Observatory), NASA - Explanation: This gorgeous visible-light Hubble Space Telescope image shows a young cluster of massive stars at the center of the 30 Doradus Nebula. Gas and dust clouds in 30 Doradus, also known as the Tarantula Nebula, have been sculpted into elongated shapes by powerful winds and ultraviolet radiation from these hot cluster stars. Insets in the picture represent corresponding views from the Hubble's infrared camera where each square measures 15.5 light-years across. Penetrating the obscuring dust, these infrared images themselves offer detailed pictures of star formation within the nebula's collapsing clouds, revealing the presence of newborn massive stars. The 30 Doradus Nebula lies within a neighboring galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud, located a mere 170,000 light-years away. Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (USRA) NASA Technical Rep.: Jay Norris. LHEA at NASA/ GSFC & Michigan Tech. U.
Lupines at Deadhorse Creek - In mid-summer, lupines blanket the slopes of Paradise Meadows with a fragrant purple palette. This scene at the head of Deadhorse Creek accents the great bulk of Mount Rainier in early morning. Photographers are challenged to capture the bright icy Mountain and the contrasting foregrounds in the same exposure. by Ron Warfield PhotoTripUSA.
Great_White_Shark-closeup - Animal Pictures Archive.
The Crab Nebula in X-Rays Credit: Chandra X-ray Observatory, NASA - Explanation: Why does the Crab Nebula still glow? In the year 1054 A.D. a supernova was observed that left a nebula that even today glows brightly in every color possible, across the entire electromagnetic spectrum. At the nebula's center is an ultra-dense neutron star that rotates 30 times a second. The power liberated as this neutron star slows its rotation matches the power radiated by the Crab Nebula. The above picture by the recently launched Chandra X-Ray Observatory shows new details of the nebula's center in X-ray light, yielding important clues to how the neutron star powers the nebula. Visible are rings of high-energy particles that are being flung outward near light-speed from the center, and powerful jets emerging from the poles. Astrophysicists continue to study and learn from this unusual engine which continually transfers 30 million times more power than lightning at nearly perfect efficiency.  Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (USRA) NASA Technical Rep.: Jay Norris. Specific rights apply. A service of: LHEA at NASA/ GSFC & Michigan Tech. U.
Our Galaxy in Stars, Gas, and Dust Credit & Copyright: John P. Gleason, Celestial Images - Explanation: The disk of our Milky Way Galaxy is home to hot nebulae, cold dust, and billions of stars. The red nebulae visible in the above contrast-enhanced picture are primarily emission nebulae, glowing clouds of hydrogen gas heated by nearby, bright, young stars. The blue nebulae are primarily reflection nebulae, clouds of gas and fine dust reflecting the light of nearby bright stars. Perhaps the most striking, though, are the areas of darkness, including the Pipe Nebula visible on the image top left. These are lanes of thick dust, many times containing relatively cold molecular clouds of gas. Dust is so plentiful that it obscures the Galactic Center in visible light, hiding its true direction until discovered early this century. The diffuse glow comes from billions of older, fainter stars like our Sun, which are typically much older than any of the nebulae. Most of the mass of our Galaxy remains in a form currently unknown. Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (USRA) NASA Technical Rep.: Jay Norris. Specific rights apply. A service of: LHEA at NASA/ GSFC & Michigan Tech. U.
Mount Rainier Reflections - Massive Mount Rainier is often seen reflected in small ephemeral pools such as this one near the summit of Plummer Peak. Most photographers scramble up to this location before dawn to catch the first light on The Mountain. The warm light of evening later in the season also yields interesting results. - by Ron Warfield PhotoTripUSA.


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